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Pony Boat

Pony Boat is a Punk, Blues, Rock band from Toronto, ON
WEBSITE www.ponyboat.com
FAVORITES 1
LISTENS 5
FRIENDS 8
PROFILE VIEWS 4143
LAST ONLINE Dec 11/07
MEMBER SINCE Dec 11/07

Biography

hat crises in the world are not large enough to merit American action? The quoted four-hundred-thousand dead in Darfur. The estimated one million massacred in the Rwandan Genocide. The oil wars in the Middle East. Oh wait... As individuals however, what moves us? Indifferent as we may be, there are still mediums by which we can be moved. Movies that tug at the heartstrings, that inform of the condition of those in the midst of genocide, and more importantly, remind us of our humanitarian side, still move us. Hotel Rwanda stirred the public consciousness by showing the heart of one ordinary man turned hero. So what of us after the movie? Did we remain apathetic? No, not immediately so. After the movie, we surfed the Internet, learning about the genocide, clicked some donation links and read how our contribution of four dollars could provide food, water, and medicine to a family for three days. We read how our larger contribution of ten dollars could rebuild a school and hire a teacher to educate children. We don't donate, not always anyway. Our brain sufficiently satisfied, and the sympathetic feelings generated by the movie already fading, we turn to some other distraction and all too quickly forget the sense of purpose we felt only minutes before. We believe that the fact that we cared so much for a period of time—took the time out of our busy day to research and feel—was enough to make the world a better place. We genuinely believe that our sympathy is our lending hand to the cause. Our inactivity is to be made up by those more affected than us, by those civilians-turned-activists. A few days later we'll receive an email from a friend we haven't thought about for years and by some miracle realize that it isn't spam. We'll catch the word “online petition” somewhere in that long email subject title. After signing the petition we have completed our civilian duty to the world. The online signature is almost like signing off our commitment to the issue. From then on, we'll be able to feel that twinge of knowledge when someone else mentions the issue. Will we truly care? Maybe for awhile, but just a few days later, we become apathetic once again. Our sympathy muscles atrophy. September 11th moved us. It was one of the few times that the country was able to come together as a whole. Those following days were surreal in their aura. Suddenly, the exact scene from a third-world-country disaster movie lay in the middle of New York City. Suddenly, the movies became real, and suddenly, we understood what it felt like to be completely misplaced—even if we personally weren't. Other countries came to our aid that day, offering their resources and concern. So what about today? Years past the death of the twin towers? Where are the patriotic flags which were so prominently displayed following September 11th? What happened to the slogan of the day—“Never Forget?” There were those who did not know it was September 11th on the date this year. We were suddenly turned activist by that day and slowly the activism is wearing off. At a moderate pace, the tragedy is shifting into the realm of history and taking it's place next to Pearl Harbor. I sincerely hope this never happens, yet it seems to be happening already. We return to a state of apathy. We are a society of realists. Idealism is noble, but not realistic. Get the kids to soccer practice first, heal the world later. It's just the way things are. Most of the time, we are looking for that missing sock in the laundry. Most of the time, we're complaining about homework, quizzes, tests, projects, and grades. Most of the time, we are hating the guy who programs pop-ups. I think he has more to fear than the terrorists do.You know how socks somehow find a mystical vortex in the laundry machine and disappear forever? Even when you put all of them inside a washable bag before throwing them in, somehow, one just has to disappear. It's the great mystery of laundry machines—where do those socks go? People used to say that the quickest way to get yourself killed was to become a lawyer. If you wanted people to hate you, become a lawyer. Why? Because lawyers don't solve anything, they just make money by prolonging problems. Everyone hates lawyers. This past summer, I met someone who didn't want to tell me what his job was. He told me I would hate him if he told me. What was it? I speculated. Are you a lawyer? The tax guy? The President of the United States of America? (just kidding!) No, he wasn't any of those. He's the guy who makes the most annoying things in the world. He makes pop-ups. The ones that appear out of nowhere when you're surfing the Internet. The ones that flash incessantly, advertising, for the split second that they are open before you hit the “x”: casinos, get-rich schemes, shoot-this-target-and-win-a-free-laptop games, Viagra, porn sites, and oh so much more.... porn that is. He's the guy who makes pop-ups; damn, I do hate him. Times have changed, the most hated profession in America is no longer the lawyer; it's the guy who makes pop-ups. Let's all hate him and maybe he'll go away. Can you remember the last time you woke up and didn't complain about anything for the whole day? They threw out your shampoo at airport security because of the liquid bomb terrorist incident. The kid down the hall won't turn down his music when you're trying to study. Your mom keeps calling you when you're in class. You can't find a girlfriend/boyfriend. You think you're fat. It's raining. George W. Bush. Green eggs and ham. Homework. Homework. In daily life, are these not the problems we care most about? Sure, every now and then we'll sit down and discuss the genocide in Rwanda, lament the shortcomings of the United Nations, or join Facebook groups about saving Darfur. We may even do this regularly in our political science classes, or read about it in the newspaper every morning, but the rest of the time, when we are just going through our ruts, it's easy to ignore the rest of the world. It's easy to become apathetic, indifferent, and live in our own familiar bubbles, live within the boundaries we consider safe. Can we be blamed? We are merely maintaining the quality of our lives. Sometimes, individually, our only link to the outside world is gas prices. It takes 43 muscles to frown and 17 to smile, but it doesn't take any to just sit there with a dumb look on our faces. Hopefully we're not just lazy. Hopefully we're not just indifferent. As a nation, America is slow to act. It takes a crisis of epic proportion to move the large and laboring America to action. So what crises in the world are not large enough to merit American action? The quoted four-hundred-thousand dead in Darfur. The estimated one million massacred in the Rwandan Genocide. The oil wars in the Middle East. Oh wait... As individuals however, what moves us? Indifferent as we may be, there are still mediums by which we can be moved. Movies that tug at the heartstrings, that inform of the condition of those in the midst of genocide, and more importantly, remind us of our humanitarian side, still move us. Hotel Rwanda stirred the public consciousness by showing the heart of one ordinary man turned hero. So what of us after the movie? Did we remain apathetic? No, not immediately so. After the movie, we surfed the Internet, learning about the genocide, clicked some donation links and read how our contribution of four dollars could provide food, water, and medicine to a family for three days. We read how our larger contribution of ten dollars could rebuild a school and hire a teacher to educate children. We don't donate, not always anyway. Our brain sufficiently satisfied, and the sympathetic feelings generated by the movie already fading, we turn to some other distraction and all too quickly forget the sense of purpose we felt only minutes before. We believe that the fact that we cared so much for a period of time—took the time out of our busy day to research and feel—was enough to make the world a better place. We genuinely believe that our sympathy is our lending hand to the cause. Our inactivity is to be made up by those more affected than us, by those civilians-turned-activists. A few days later we'll receive an email from a friend we haven't thought about for years and by some miracle realize that it isn't spam. We'll catch the word “online petition” somewhere in that long email subject title. After signing the petition we have completed our civilian duty to the world. The online signature is almost like signing off our commitment to the issue. From then on, we'll be able to feel that twinge of knowledge when someone else mentions the issue. Will we truly care? Maybe for awhile, but just a few days later, we become apathetic once again. Our sympathy muscles atrophy. September 11th moved us. It was one of the few times that the country was able to come together as a whole. Those following days were surreal in their aura. Suddenly, the exact scene from a third-world-country disaster movie lay in the middle of New York City. Suddenly, the movies became real, and suddenly, we understood what it felt like to be completely misplaced—even if we personally weren't. Other countries came to our aid that day, offering their resources and concern. So what about today? Years past the death of the twin towers? Where are the patriotic flags which were so prominently displayed following September 11th? What happened to the slogan of the day—“Never Forget?” There were those who did not know it was September 11th on the date this year. We were suddenly turned activist by that day and slowly the activism is wearing off. At a moderate pace, the tragedy is shifting into the realm of history and taking it's place next to Pearl Harbor. I sincerely hope this never happens, yet it seems to be happening already. We return to a state of apathy. We are a society of realists. Idealism is noble, but not realistic. Get the kids to soccer practice first, heal the world later. It's just the way things are. Most of the time, we are looking for that missing sock in the laundry. Most of the time, we're complaining about homework, quizzes, tests, projects, and grades. Most of the time, we are hating the guy who programs pop-ups. I think he has more to fear than the terrorists do.You know how socks somehow find a mystical vortex in the laundry machine and disappear forever? Even when you put all of them inside a washable bag before throwing them in, somehow, one just has to disappear. It's the great mystery of laundry machines—where do those socks go? People used to say that the quickest way to get yourself killed was to become a lawyer. If you wanted people to hate you, become a lawyer. Why? Because lawyers don't solve anything, they just make money by prolonging problems. Everyone hates lawyers. This past summer, I met someone who didn't want to tell me what his job was. He told me I would hate him if he told me. What was it? I speculated. Are you a lawyer? The tax guy? The President of the United States of America? (just kidding!) No, he wasn't any of those. He's the guy who makes the most annoying things in the world. He makes pop-ups. The ones that appear out of nowhere when you're surfing the Internet. The ones that flash incessantly, advertising, for the split second that they are open before you hit the “x”: casinos, get-rich schemes, shoot-this-target-and-win-a-free-laptop games, Viagra, porn sites, and oh so much more.... porn that is. He's the guy who makes pop-ups; damn, I do hate him. Times have changed, the most hated profession in America is no longer the lawyer; it's the guy who makes pop-ups. Let's all hate him and maybe he'll go away. Can you remember the last time you woke up and didn't complain about anything for the whole day? They threw out your shampoo at airport security because of the liquid bomb terrorist incident. The kid down the hall won't turn down his music when you're trying to study. Your mom keeps calling you when you're in class. You can't find a girlfriend/boyfriend. You think you're fat. It's raining. George W. Bush. Green eggs and ham. Homework. Homework. In daily life, are these not the problems we care most about? Sure, every now and then we'll sit down and discuss the genocide in Rwanda, lament the shortcomings of the United Nations, or join Facebook groups about saving Darfur. We may even do this regularly in our political science classes, or read about it in the newspaper every morning, but the rest of the time, when we are just going through our ruts, it's easy to ignore the rest of the world. It's easy to become apathetic, indifferent, and live in our own familiar bubbles, live within the boundaries we consider safe. Can we be blamed? We are merely maintaining the quality of our lives. Sometimes, individually, our only link to the outside world is gas prices. It takes 43 muscles to frown and 17 to smile, but it doesn't take any to just sit there with a dumb look on our faces. Hopefully we're not just lazy. Hopefully we're not just indifferent. As a nation, America is slow to act. It takes a crisis of epic proportion to move the large and laboring America to action. So what crises in the world are not large enough to merit American action? The quoted four-hundred-thousand dead in Darfur. The estimated one million massacred in the Rwandan Genocide. The oil wars in the Middle East. Oh wait... As individuals however, what moves us? Indifferent as we may be, there are still mediums by which we can be moved. Movies that tug at the heartstrings, that inform of the condition of those in the midst of genocide, and more importantly, remind us of our humanitarian side, still move us. Hotel Rwanda stirred the public consciousness by showing the heart of one ordinary man turned hero. So what of us after the movie? Did we remain apathetic? No, not immediately so. After the movie, we surfed the Internet, learning about the genocide, clicked some donation links and read how our contribution of four dollars could provide food, water, and medicine to a family for three days. We read how our larger contribution of ten dollars could rebuild a school and hire a teacher to educate children. We don't donate, not always anyway. Our brain sufficiently satisfied, and the sympathetic feelings generated by the movie already fading, we turn to some other distraction and all too quickly forget the sense of purpose we felt only minutes before. We believe that the fact that we cared so much for a period of time—took the time out of our busy day to research and feel—was enough to make the world a better place. We genuinely believe that our sympathy is our lending hand to the cause. Our inactivity is to be made up by those more affected than us, by those civilians-turned-activists. A few days later we'll receive an email from a friend we haven't thought about for years and by some miracle realize that it isn't spam. We'll catch the word “online petition” somewhere in that long email subject title. After signing the petition we have completed our civilian duty to the world. The online signature is almost like signing off our commitment to the issue. From then on, we'll be able to feel that twinge of knowledge when someone else mentions the issue. Will we truly care? Maybe for awhile, but just a few days later, we become apathetic once again. Our sympathy muscles atrophy. September 11th moved us. It was one of the few times that the country was able to come together as a whole. Those following days were surreal in their aura. Suddenly, the exact scene from a third-world-country disaster movie lay in the middle of New York City. Suddenly, the movies became real, and suddenly, we understood what it felt like to be completely misplaced—even if we personally weren't. Other countries came to our aid that day, offering their resources and concern. So what about today? Years past the death of the twin towers? Where are the patriotic flags which were so prominently displayed following September 11th? What happened to the slogan of the day—“Never Forget?” There were those who did not know it was September 11th on the date this year. We were suddenly turned activist by that day and slowly the activism is wearing off. At a moderate pace, the tragedy is shifting into the realm of history and taking it's place next to Pearl Harbor. I sincerely hope this never happens, yet it seems to be happening already. We return to a state of apathy. We are a society of realists. Idealism is noble, but not realistic. Get the kids to soccer practice first, heal the world later. It's just the way things are. Most of the time, we are looking for that missing sock in the laundry. Most of the time, we're complaining about homework, quizzes, tests, projects, and grades. Most of the time, we are hating the guy who programs pop-ups. I think he has more to fear than the terrorists do.

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